top of page

Changes made in food label

Updated: Mar 4


👍To make sure consumers have access to more recent and accurate nutrition information about the foods they are eating, FDA required changes based on updated scientific information, new nutrition and public health research, more recent dietary recommendations from expert groups, and input from the public.


🤩The changes include modifying the list of required nutrients that must be declared on the label, updating serving size requirements, and providing a refreshed design. The current Nutrition Facts label makes it easier for consumers to make informed decisions about the food they eat.


🤗The FDA recognizes that added sugars can be a part of a healthy dietary pattern. But if consumed in excess, it becomes more difficult to also eat foods with enough dietary fiber and essential vitamins and minerals and still stay within calorie limits. The updates to the label will help increase consumer awareness of the quantity of added sugars in foods. Consumers may or may not decide to reduce the consumption of certain foods with added sugars, based on their individual needs or preferences.


😊Vitamin D and potassium are nutrients Americans don’t always get enough of, according to nationwide food consumption surveys (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes/), and when lacking, are associated with increased risk of chronic disease. Vitamin D is important for its role in bone health, and potassium helps to lower blood pressure. Calcium and iron are already required and will continue to be on the label.


🧐Trans fat will be reduced but not eliminated from foods, so FDA will continue to require it on the label. In 2015, the FDA published a final determination that partially hydrogenated oils (PHOs), the source of artificial trans fat, are not generally recognized as safe, but this determination would not affect naturally occurring trans fat, which would still exist in the food supply.


Changes made:


  • Highlighting “Calories,” “servings per container,” and the “Serving size” declaration by increasing the type size and placing the number of calories and the “Serving size” declaration in bold type.

  • Requiring manufacturers to declare the actual amount, in addition to percent Daily Value, of the mandatory vitamins and minerals.

  • Adding “Includes X g Added Sugars” directly beneath the listing for “Total Sugars.” Some sugars such as honey and maple syrup do not have to list the number of grams of added sugars but must still include the %Daily Value.

  • Changing the footnote to better explain the percent Daily Value. It will now read: “*The % Daily Value tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.”




Please like, share and comment for more information.

Sincerely

Kinjal

16 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments

Rated 0 out of 5 stars.
No ratings yet

Add a rating
bottom of page